DC High Holiday Classes and Events 5778

Apples and honey for Rosh Hashanah/ image courtesy of wikipedia

L’shanah tova! A new year will be upon us in under a month—and with that, my favorite holiday. 😀 Bring on the apples and honey!

For tickets, J-Connect has in depth detail concerning fees, schedules and more for DC and area MD and VA synagogues. Gather DC focuses more specifically on young adults, and has links to services and other activities to help this cohort connect.

Washington also offers classes and events to inform you and get you in the spirit of high holidays! I’ve gathered up a few offerings from Sixth & I and the Edlavitch DCJCC, JCCNV and the Bender JCC. Please leave others in the comments!


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Wednesday, September 6
The Beauty of Sephardic High Holidays, 7:30 pm, Sixth & I
https://www.sixthandi.org/event/16737/

Thursday, September 7 and 14
Ten Steps Toward Teshuvah, 7:45 pm, Sixth & I
https://www.sixthandi.org/event/ten-steps-toward-teshuva/

Sunday, September 10
Repentance, Forgiveness, Personal Change: Entering the Days of Awe with Mechon Hadar, 2 pm, EDCJCC
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1163557695?view=Detail&id=153547

Sunday, September 10
Fall into the Holidays, 2 pm, JCCNV
http://www.jccnv.org/index.php?src=events&srctype=detail&category=Upcoming%20Events&refno=187939

Monday, September 11
Go Creative for the Jewish New Year!, 2 pm, JCCNV
http://www.jccnv.org/index.php?src=events&srctype=detail&category=Adults&refno=187988

Tuesday, September 12
High Holiday Sampler featuring Joan Nathan and her new cookbook, King Solomon’s Table, 7 pm, Bender JCC.
http://www.benderjccgw.org/event/high-holiday-sampler/

Wednesday, September 13 and 27
Take on Yom Kippur, 6 pm, Sixth & I
https://www.sixthandi.org/event/take-yom-kippur/

Sunday, September 17
Community Apple Picking, 1 pm, JCCNV
http://www.jccnv.org/index.php?src=events&srctype=detail&category=Upcoming%20Events&refno=187945

Wednesday, September 20 (Erev Rosh Hashanah)
Day of Awe-Some: Exploring Rosh Hashanah, 4 pm, EDCJCC
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1163557695?view=Detail&id=153548

Thursday, September 21 (Rosh Hashanah)
Apples and Honeys, 10 am, Bender JCC
http://www.benderjccgw.org/event/apples-honeys/

Sunday, September 24
Apples for Everyone, 11 am, EDCJCC
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/932959594?view=Detail&id=153551

Saturday, September 30 (Yom Kippur)
I am Sorry Day, 10 am, Bender JCC
http://www.benderjccgw.org/event/im-sorry-day/

May you have a sweet new year!

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Theater J’s “Broken Glass” Run Extended Until July 16!

The “Broken Glass” cast talks with Theater J staff about the play / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

Today was supposed to be the last day that DC-area theater-goers could see “Broken Glass,” but now there’s a full new week of production! This is one of Arthur Miller’s last written plays (1995) and it centers around a group of American Jews reacting to Kristallnacht.

…well, kinda. Sylvia Gellburg (Lise Bruneau) loses the use of her legs after reading about and getting slightly wrapped up in the horrors happening in 1938 Germany. But she’s also dealing with a sexless marriage and falling in love with her doctor, Harry Hyman (Gregory Linington). Her husband, Phillip, (Paul Morella) struggles with wanting to assimilate in a world that still seems to infer that he’s an outsider.

I was reading a similar novel, The Houseguest by Kim Brooks, at the time, and in the midst of grappling with the difficulties in being objective with stories about the Holocaust. Every time Sylvia griped about something going on overseas that I knew was only the tip of the iceberg, and every time one of the men would attempt to contain her emotions as overwrought, I found myself getting frustrated. I tried to understand their worldview, and found it easiest to digest when characters would talk about America being seemingly different–a respite from a 2,000-plus year history of antisemitic persecution. And indeed perhaps in 1938, to the average American Jew, Kristallnacht felt like “just another pogrom.” Dr. Hyman had a nicely explored backstory in Heidelberg (where he got his medical degree due to Jewish quotas at U.S. universities), so we also got to see his grief and denial about what Germany was becoming. He was very astute about “the persecution complex,” and how everybody, Hitler above all, felt persecuted by others, but never turned the mirror on themselves.

But over all, I’m not sure that it fully works, juxtaposing these domestic dramas against Kristallnacht. It would be like a modern-setting play occasionally interrupting a monologue on a failed marriage with anecdotes from Syria.

I attended the play on June 29 because of the cast talkback session after the production. Among other topics discussed (like the intentionally ambiguous ending, complete with Phillip wearing concentration camp-striped pajamas) the actors mentioned how this play was Miller’s attempt to connect with his oft-ignored Jewish heritage. That in itself feels a little awkward to me–exploring your feelings of Jewish identity as an older man at the end of the 20th century through having characters react to Kristallnacht when it was still fresh. This isn’t The Crucible, where the Salem Witch Trials are allegorical for McCarthyism. This is about struggling with guilt concerning a very specific event in history, and I suppose I’m always a little disquieted by viewing the whole of Jewish identity through the Holocaust.

In technical terms, the play was very arresting. With only a few props on a minimalist set the actors took center stage, and their interactions were riveting whether played for comedy or drama. The production team worked with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum to project period imagery onto the shattered glass background whenever there was a transition between scenes. Udi Bar-David played a haunting cello, and the cast confirmed that he performed original pieces, which were recorded at the University of Maryland.

All in all I think that it’s a play that you should judge for yourself; you can buy tickets here. Check out my past coverage of DC plays here!

My Washington Jewish Film Fest ’17: Soviet-era documentary and Hasidic narrative film about single fatherhood

Filmmaker Anat Zalmanson-Kuznetsov speaks to a DC audience about OPERATION WEDDING, with writer Paul Goldberg in the background / photo taken by Rachel Mauro


Last Thursday, May 18, I made my way to Bethesda Row Cinema for the DC premiere of the documentary Operation Wedding. Filmmaker Anat Zalmanson-Kuznetsov sought to explore a new angle to the story of her already infamous parents, who in 1970 led a group of mostly Jewish dissidents on a failed attempt to escape the Soviet Union. Donned “Operation Wedding” because of their cover story of commandeering a plane for that purpose, they instead intended to use it to hop the border. They were caught and spent years in the gulag until international efforts got them out.

The film probes the idea of national perspective—whether these people were “heroes” or “terrorists,” and delves a bit into the storied Russian propaganda about the case. We also see rallies and hunger strikes abroad in an attempt to free Zalmanson-Kuznetsov’s parents and more broadly the Soviet Jewish community. But perhaps the most moving part, certainly according to some of the audience, was filmed recently for this project. Zalmanson-Kuznetsov brought her mother back to her Latvian prison where she recalled dissociating from her harsh reality by waltzing in the courtyard.

The variety of footage and the close, personal connection gave this film a unique feel, like it was partially documentary and partially narrative, too. Zalmanson-Kuznetsov interviewed family and friends and probed her parents’ motives, which ultimately seemed to have less to do with escaping themselves than with forcing open a small crack in the Iron Curtain for Soviet Jews as a whole. The family now lives in Israel.

The screening was followed by a short Q&A, and discussion between Zalmanson-Kuznetsov and local Russian American author Paul Goldberg (spoiler alert—I’m reading his The Yid right now!) I thought that this would be my only time to see a filmmaker this festival season, but on Sunday night at AFI, Menashe director Joshua Z. Weinstein and star Menashe Lustig, also took a few minutes to speak at the end. Lustig sat next to me in the front row of the sold out theatre!

MENASHE director Joshua Z. Weinstein and star Menashe Lustig in conversation with WJFF director Ilya Tovbis / photo taken by Rachel Mauro


Menashe is another film that sort of teases the line between fact and fiction. Although a traditional, narrative movie, it is based heavily on the real Menashe’s life. He is also a widowed Hasid who ultimately lost unofficial custody of his son.

The film, spoken largely in Yiddish, chronicles Menashe’s struggles with single fatherhood and desire to maintain a relationship with his young child. But despite a couple of annoying characters, it doesn’t paint his traditional community as repressive. There are plenty of reasons why the son is better off with his aunt and uncle, not the least of which is that Menashe can barely make financial ends meet for himself. Ultimately, it’s a very transcendent, slightly comic human tale about struggle and relationships.

In the Q&A with WJFF Director Ilya Tovbis following the screening, the guests covered such topics as working with non-professional actors in the Hasidic community, the non-religious director’s personal takeaways from this project, and the star’s entrée into a more secular world. Lustig hadn’t entered a movie theater until promoting this project, it was revealed, but even as a child, he admitted to acting “talents” that he wanted to share. As usual at these sort of cultural events, as the member of a haredi community, he also acted as a gracious ambassador.

After dozens of screenings across the greater Washington area, the 27th Washington Jewish Film Festival comes to a close this Sunday, May 28. Personally, I’m itching to see one more film…you just may see me at this one on the final day. Otherwise, check out my past coverage of this event under the “Annual Events” tab.

Local Writers Explore the Theme of Unexpected Journeys at the 2017 Washington, DC Jewish Literary Festival

Local authors fair, consisting of Robert Gillette, Carolivia Herron, Peter Lovenheim, Elizabeth Poliner, Jennifer Robins, Benjamin Shalva, Paula Shoyer, Marlene Trestman and moderator Leslie Maitland / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

Despite a bit of a false start with the snow earlier this week, the 19th Jewish Literary Festival put on by the EDCJCC kicked off on Wednesday evening with a panel of 8 local authors, and writer Leslie Maitland moderating.

Book topics ranged from Holocaust history to cookbooks to fiction and other nonfiction. Find a full list of titles here. Each author was given a little bit of time to introduce his/her work and apply it to the theme. Unsurprisingly for this sort of set up, some peoples’ narratives fit better into the idea of “unexplored journeys” than other peoples’ but they each obviously put a lot of thought and care into his/her project.

The story that intrigued me the most came from Peter Lovenheim, who, after a brutal murder-suicide on his block, felt the impetus to get to know his neighbors, and probe the idea of community in the modern age. He wrote the nonfiction book, In the Neighborhood: The Search for Community on an American Street, One Sleepover at a Time. I’m also always curious about the intersection of Judaism and other cultures, which Jewish African American Carolivia Herron, covers in her novels (Peacesong DC) and children’s stories (Nappy Hair). And I have a personal connection to Elizabeth Poliner; she presided over my advanced fiction workshops a few years back at the Bethesda, MD-based Writer’s Center. Her novel, As Close to Us As Breathing, concerns the tragedy that befalls a Jewish American family in the 1940s; here she divulged that the title came to her via a prayer from the Kol Nidre service.

The event lasted a little over an hour, giving participants enough time to introduce themselves and answer a couple of questions. The audience queried about such things ranging from specific characters in a certain book to the nature of finding a publisher or agent. Speaking of diversity, that last one tends to lead to a variety of answers, too! After conclusion, the EDCJCC offered a table of desserts, and authors stuck around to sell and sign their books.

The literary festival continues through to this Sunday, March 19; you can find the rest of the schedule here. (The Bethesda Jewish Congregation is also hosting an event with journalist and bestseller, Iris Krasnow that afternoon!) The official opening event, Noa Baum’s solo talk about her memoir, A Land Twice Promised: An Israeli Woman’s Quest for Peace, has been moved to April 27.

Celebrate Purim in 5777!

Esther scroll / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Esther scroll / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Purim starts on March 11, a festive holiday of rejoicing, yet again, in the fact that we (the Jews) have survived an attempt at persecution. Though not as noticeable to the outside world as, say, Chanukah, it is definitely as fun—allowing people of all ages to dress up, eat special sweets, and wave noisemakers called groggers as the Megillah (book of Esther) is read out enthusiastically.

…but you don’t have to wait until the 14th of Adar to dress up as your favorite Biblical character, or at least to get down. Enjoy these local offerings of Purim-related festivities leading up to and encompassing this holiday weekend!

Wednesday, March 8
Young Adults Pre-Purim Happy Hour
https://youngleadership.wufoo.com/forms/rzxnq4b09q133o/

The Max Ticktin Annual Latke-Hamentaschen Debate
jconnect

Purim Weekend
Washington Hebrew Congregation’s Purim at the Oscars, Purim Lock-In, Purim Carnival
http://www.whctemple.org/purim

Adas Israel’s The World Upside Down Purim, Purim Pajama Party, Breakfast Reception and Rooftop Party, Sing-Along, Costume Parade and Carnival
http://adasisrael.org/purim/

Tikvat Israel’s Purim Celebration, Nosh ‘n’ Spiel, On the Persian Carpet: A Purim Broadway Revue, Puppet Production Family Celebration
http://tikvatisrael.org/events/purim-services-maariv-megillah/

Friday, March 10
Tot Purim @ Temple Shalom
jconnect

Saturday, March 11
Pride of Purim: A Queer Masquerade
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1601753210?view=Detail&id=153143

Grogger and Glow: A Purim Celebration
https://www.sixthandi.org/event/grogger-glow-purim-celebration/

Bethesda Jewish Congregation’s Purim Spiel: Thank God I’m a Country Jew
http://bethesdajewish.org/event/adult-purim-spiel/

Congregation Har Tzeon-Agudath Achim’s Purim Pajama Jam
https://www.htaa.org/event/purim-pajama-jam.html

Sunday, March 12
EDCCJCC Purim Carnival
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1601753210?view=Detail&id=153100

Temple Shalom’s Purim Puppet Show and Carnival
jconnect

Bender JCC Purim Party
http://www.benderjccgw.org/event/purim-party-2/

Adat Shalom’s Purim Palooza
jconnect

PJ Library and various sponsors present sensory friendly Purim celebrations
https://youngleadership.wufoo.com/forms/r1n1dtzs0s44me6/

Commemorate MLK Weekend and Tu B’Shevat 5777 in DC!

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel with Martin Luther King, Jr in 1965 / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel with Martin Luther King, Jr in 1965 / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Happy 2017! As this is my first post of the year, I thought I’d share a few stats from 2016. According to WordPress, JewishDC got 1,901 views and 1,356 visitors, with the largest numbers coming from the US, Brazil, Russia and India. Wow! My most popular post of the year was Black Jews Documentary and More at the Washington, DC Jewish Film Festival.

Thanks so much for your support, everyone, and I look forward to a fruitful new secular year! Let’s get into some holidays and community service.

As we enter the second half of January and the first half of February, one secular and one religious holiday crop up on the horizon. The long weekend set aside for commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. starts Saturday, Jan. 14, and Tu B’Shevat commences on Feb.10. Check out ways to get involved with the local community! Note: some events may be sold out.

Please feel free to add more events in the comments.

MLK Weekend

  • Sixth & I’s Visions of Freedom and Justice. In conjunction with Turner Memorial AME church and featuring their two choirs. Also focusing on the work of Civil Rights activist Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel.
  • Washington Hebrew Congregation’s MLK Shabbat Dinner. Hosting partner churches and mosques, with special guest Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II. Rev. Dr. Barber was the architect of the North Carolina-based Forward Together Moral Movement and was a keynote speaker at the 2016 Democratic National Convention, amongst other things. Followed by Shabbat service.
  • Adas Israel’s Weekend of Tikkun Olam. Featuring a Friday night Return Again Shabbat service, dinner, and a Saturday morning service with guest speakers. On Sunday, a service at the Peoples Congregational United Church of Christ with guest speaker Charles Cobb, former activist, senior analyst at allAfrica.com, and more.
  • Also check out Monday days of service with WHC and the EDCJCC (links courtesy of GatherTheJews.com).

Tu B’Shevat

Chag Sameach!

DC Chanukah Happenings 5777!

Graphic courtesy of Webweavers

Graphic courtesy of Webweavers

The multi-holiday season is upon us; weather is occasionally fluctuating towards the cold, and people are counting the days, if they’re not there already, until they get a little time off from work or school. It’s time to fry those latkes and kindle the Chanukah lights! Local Jewish groups are rolling out the red carpet for this well-known Jewish holiday, which will take place this year from sundown Dec. 24 to sundown Jan. 1. Check these out! Feel free to add more in the comments, and chag sameach.

Hanukkah Happy Hour on the Hill
Annual young adult shindig sponsored by several Jewish organizations. Bring warm clothing for collection boxes headed to DC homeless community, sponsored by the EDCJCC.
Tuesday, Dec. 20, 6 pm, Capitol Lounge and Hawk N’ Dove

Chanukah at the Ellipse
American Friends of Lubavitch starts off the holiday season with this annual ceremony on the White House lawn.
Sunday, Dec. 25, 4 pm, the Ellipse

Community Chanukah Lighting
Family friendly inclusion & disabilities programming event, featuring lighting the menorah, eating Chanukah foods, spinning the dreidel, and more!
Wednesday, Dec. 28, 6:30 pm, EDCJCC

Hanukkah’s Extra Flame
Adas Israel, the EDJCC and other organizations team up with Sephardic Heritage in DC to provide a holiday concert, featuring internationally recognized Syrian opera singer, Lubana Al Quantar. The event will also center around relief efforts.
Wednesday, Dec. 28, 7 pm, Adas Israel

Adas Israel Hanukkah Events
Featuring info about observance, themed community events and more.

Check out more events for young professionals provided by Gather The Jews here!