DC Chanukah Happenings 5779!

Chanukah Menorah/ photo courtesy of Wikipedia

The winter holidays are upon us, and Chanukah is on the early side this year! The holiday begins on the evening of December 2 and it lasts until December 9. It’s almost time to fry those latkes and kindle the menorah lights! Check out these local events happening around town, and feel free to add more in the comments. Chag Sameach!

Wednesday, November 28
Hipster Hanukkah Holiday Market
Etsy in real life, plus other fun things!
6:30 pm, Foundry United Methodist Church

Sunday, December 2
Celebrate Chanukah with Makers Day at the J
Children’s crafting event for the holiday!
10 am, Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia

Make Room for the Latkes 2018
Family fun event with a focus on interfaith families!
10:30 am, Milton Gottesman Jewish Day School of the Nation’s Capital

Chanukah at the Ellipse
American Friends of Lubavitch starts off the holiday season with this annual ceremony on the White House lawn.
4 pm, The Ellipse

Monday, December 3
Family Chanukah Party
Candle lighting, holiday food, story time and crafts!
5:30 pm, Bender JCC

Wednesday, December 5
Light up the Night! Community Menorah Lighting
Light candles, sing songs, enjoy entertainment!
5:30 pm, Mosaic District

Hanukkah Happy Hour (Off) the Hill: Time Hop Edition
Annual young adult soiree with an ‘80s/’90s theme, drinks, food specials and surprises. Plus a clothing drive!
6 pm, Decades

My So-Called Jewish Life
Not entirely Chanukah-related, but the 10th annual presentation of autobiographical stories from Story District.
7:30 pm, Sixth & I

Thursday, December 6
Oh Gaydel, Oh Gaydel!
Celebrate the holiday with the LGBTQ Jewish community!
6 pm, Pitchers DC

Sunday, December 9
Hadar: Beyond the Chanukkiah
Morning workshops on various aspects of Jewish education around the holiday.
10 am, the Broadmoor

Sunday, December 16
Zemer Chai Holiday Concert
According to their website, this festival of lights will be filled with songs of justice, compassion and freedom of religion
6 pm, Kennedy Center

Israeli Award-Winning Film Explores Forbidden Love in Cloistered Community

“Red Cow” movie poster / courtesy of the Israel Film Fund

Despite the first snow and sleet of the season, a full house of Washingtonians gathered at Bethesda Row Cinema last Thursday night for a showing of the Israeli film Red Cow. The movie was aired as part of the Edlavitch Jewish Community Center’s Washington Jewish Film Festival Year-Round Program. It was co-presented by Tagg Magazine and Reel Affirmations.

“Red Cow” (or “Para Aduma” in Hebrew) is named for the biblically heralded red heifer which portends a return to Jewish temple worship in the Holy Land. The movie opens when a fundamentalist religious group finds a cow that fits that description and assigns main character, Benny (Avigayil Koevary) with taking care of her.

Benny’s father Yehoshua (Gal Toren) is the leader of a gated community in East Jerusalem, which prays for a return to ancient Jewish life. He relies heavily on his only daughter, and seeming family after his mother’s death, but Benny feels alienated from his beliefs. The film chronicles her sexual awakening as she gets involved with new girl Yael (Moran Rosenblatt.)

Like most foreign films, at least in my limited experience, this hour and a half long feature is a very minimalist affair. Though Yehoshua quotes Scripture and argues with other religious men about politics, he never has a speech where he declares “Welcome to my compound! Here are the rules!” Deference from other characters points him as the leader, and he seems to be in charge of a school for girls. Otherwise, Benny spends her time praying with him when he can’t find a minyan and grabbing him from an ancient mikveh late at night.

The East Jerusalem landscape feels larger than life with its expansive views of ancient structures and roadways, and its audio populated by the muzzein and quickly chanted Hebrew prayer. Certainly lends to the air of conflict, as does Yehoshua trying to force entrance into the Temple Mount on Yom Kippur, and speaking blithely about destroying the Dome of the Rock and the people who must die to bring about his fundamentalist utopia.

But it’s such a personal story without any real threat that the man mostly comes off as cold, sad and awkward as his daughter’s indiscretions come to light. Again, it’s more about what he intuits from interpersonal scenes than any big revelations. Benny and Yael’s love affair is fast and viscerally shot. The relationship carries no dramatic climax cast to a cinematic score. One might even say that Benny’s relationship with the young cow brings more emotional gravitas. But the question of who she really is remains at the forefront of her troubled existence, even when the final scene takes her to the secular world.

Red Cow was nominated this year for 4 Ophirs (the Israeli Oscars) and it won for best feature and best actress for Avigayil Kovary. It is also Tsivia Barkai Yacov’s directorial debut, and is just recently making its rounds in the United States. Click here for more information. And you can find my similar content and movie reviews under the Books, Plays, Music and Movies tab!