Jewish Supreme Court Justices, Family Genealogy and Military Service Dominate 2017 Jewish American Heritage Month in DC

First Jewish U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Louis Brandeis / photo courtesy of wikipedia

May is around the corner, and with it the 11th annual Jewish American Heritage Month! The official website has been updated with upcoming events at venues around the country.

The Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington is teaming up with the National Archives to present this event:

Lecture and Book Signing with Dr. David Dalin, May 4, 7pm
Historian and Rabbi Dr. David Dalin will be in conversation with U.S. Solicitor General Seth Waxman about his recent book release, Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan. Book signing to follow!

Other events in the DC include Jewish genealogy lectures with DAR Library Manuscript Curator Pamela Baster on May 4 and with genealogist Daniel Horowitz at the Library of Congress on May 8. On Memorial Day weekend, The National Museum of American Jewish Military History is teaming up with Sixth & I to present a Shabbat service in honor of the Jewish service people who died in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Please feel free to add any comments about other JAHM events happening in the area. Check out my past coverage of Jewish American Heritage Month under the “Annual Events” tab.

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Local Writers Explore the Theme of Unexpected Journeys at the 2017 Washington, DC Jewish Literary Festival

Local authors fair, consisting of Robert Gillette, Carolivia Herron, Peter Lovenheim, Elizabeth Poliner, Jennifer Robins, Benjamin Shalva, Paula Shoyer, Marlene Trestman and moderator Leslie Maitland / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

Despite a bit of a false start with the snow earlier this week, the 19th Jewish Literary Festival put on by the EDCJCC kicked off on Wednesday evening with a panel of 8 local authors, and writer Leslie Maitland moderating.

Book topics ranged from Holocaust history to cookbooks to fiction and other nonfiction. Find a full list of titles here. Each author was given a little bit of time to introduce his/her work and apply it to the theme. Unsurprisingly for this sort of set up, some peoples’ narratives fit better into the idea of “unexplored journeys” than other peoples’ but they each obviously put a lot of thought and care into his/her project.

The story that intrigued me the most came from Peter Lovenheim, who, after a brutal murder-suicide on his block, felt the impetus to get to know his neighbors, and probe the idea of community in the modern age. He wrote the nonfiction book, In the Neighborhood: The Search for Community on an American Street, One Sleepover at a Time. I’m also always curious about the intersection of Judaism and other cultures, which Jewish African American Carolivia Herron, covers in her novels (Peacesong DC) and children’s stories (Nappy Hair). And I have a personal connection to Elizabeth Poliner; she presided over my advanced fiction workshops a few years back at the Bethesda, MD-based Writer’s Center. Her novel, As Close to Us As Breathing, concerns the tragedy that befalls a Jewish American family in the 1940s; here she divulged that the title came to her via a prayer from the Kol Nidre service.

The event lasted a little over an hour, giving participants enough time to introduce themselves and answer a couple of questions. The audience queried about such things ranging from specific characters in a certain book to the nature of finding a publisher or agent. Speaking of diversity, that last one tends to lead to a variety of answers, too! After conclusion, the EDCJCC offered a table of desserts, and authors stuck around to sell and sign their books.

The literary festival continues through to this Sunday, March 19; you can find the rest of the schedule here. (The Bethesda Jewish Congregation is also hosting an event with journalist and bestseller, Iris Krasnow that afternoon!) The official opening event, Noa Baum’s solo talk about her memoir, A Land Twice Promised: An Israeli Woman’s Quest for Peace, has been moved to April 27.

Celebrate Purim in 5777!

Esther scroll / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Esther scroll / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Purim starts on March 11, a festive holiday of rejoicing, yet again, in the fact that we (the Jews) have survived an attempt at persecution. Though not as noticeable to the outside world as, say, Chanukah, it is definitely as fun—allowing people of all ages to dress up, eat special sweets, and wave noisemakers called groggers as the Megillah (book of Esther) is read out enthusiastically.

…but you don’t have to wait until the 14th of Adar to dress up as your favorite Biblical character, or at least to get down. Enjoy these local offerings of Purim-related festivities leading up to and encompassing this holiday weekend!

Wednesday, March 8
Young Adults Pre-Purim Happy Hour
https://youngleadership.wufoo.com/forms/rzxnq4b09q133o/

The Max Ticktin Annual Latke-Hamentaschen Debate
jconnect

Purim Weekend
Washington Hebrew Congregation’s Purim at the Oscars, Purim Lock-In, Purim Carnival
http://www.whctemple.org/purim

Adas Israel’s The World Upside Down Purim, Purim Pajama Party, Breakfast Reception and Rooftop Party, Sing-Along, Costume Parade and Carnival
http://adasisrael.org/purim/

Tikvat Israel’s Purim Celebration, Nosh ‘n’ Spiel, On the Persian Carpet: A Purim Broadway Revue, Puppet Production Family Celebration
http://tikvatisrael.org/events/purim-services-maariv-megillah/

Friday, March 10
Tot Purim @ Temple Shalom
jconnect

Saturday, March 11
Pride of Purim: A Queer Masquerade
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1601753210?view=Detail&id=153143

Grogger and Glow: A Purim Celebration
https://www.sixthandi.org/event/grogger-glow-purim-celebration/

Bethesda Jewish Congregation’s Purim Spiel: Thank God I’m a Country Jew
http://bethesdajewish.org/event/adult-purim-spiel/

Congregation Har Tzeon-Agudath Achim’s Purim Pajama Jam
https://www.htaa.org/event/purim-pajama-jam.html

Sunday, March 12
EDCCJCC Purim Carnival
http://thejdc.convio.net/site/Calendar/1601753210?view=Detail&id=153100

Temple Shalom’s Purim Puppet Show and Carnival
jconnect

Bender JCC Purim Party
http://www.benderjccgw.org/event/purim-party-2/

Adat Shalom’s Purim Palooza
jconnect

PJ Library and various sponsors present sensory friendly Purim celebrations
https://youngleadership.wufoo.com/forms/r1n1dtzs0s44me6/

Commemorate MLK Weekend and Tu B’Shevat 5777 in DC!

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel with Martin Luther King, Jr in 1965 / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel with Martin Luther King, Jr in 1965 / photo courtesy of wikipedia

Happy 2017! As this is my first post of the year, I thought I’d share a few stats from 2016. According to WordPress, JewishDC got 1,901 views and 1,356 visitors, with the largest numbers coming from the US, Brazil, Russia and India. Wow! My most popular post of the year was Black Jews Documentary and More at the Washington, DC Jewish Film Festival.

Thanks so much for your support, everyone, and I look forward to a fruitful new secular year! Let’s get into some holidays and community service.

As we enter the second half of January and the first half of February, one secular and one religious holiday crop up on the horizon. The long weekend set aside for commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. starts Saturday, Jan. 14, and Tu B’Shevat commences on Feb.10. Check out ways to get involved with the local community! Note: some events may be sold out.

Please feel free to add more events in the comments.

MLK Weekend

  • Sixth & I’s Visions of Freedom and Justice. In conjunction with Turner Memorial AME church and featuring their two choirs. Also focusing on the work of Civil Rights activist Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel.
  • Washington Hebrew Congregation’s MLK Shabbat Dinner. Hosting partner churches and mosques, with special guest Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II. Rev. Dr. Barber was the architect of the North Carolina-based Forward Together Moral Movement and was a keynote speaker at the 2016 Democratic National Convention, amongst other things. Followed by Shabbat service.
  • Adas Israel’s Weekend of Tikkun Olam. Featuring a Friday night Return Again Shabbat service, dinner, and a Saturday morning service with guest speakers. On Sunday, a service at the Peoples Congregational United Church of Christ with guest speaker Charles Cobb, former activist, senior analyst at allAfrica.com, and more.
  • Also check out Monday days of service with WHC and the EDCJCC (links courtesy of GatherTheJews.com).

Tu B’Shevat

Chag Sameach!

DC Chanukah Happenings 5777!

Graphic courtesy of Webweavers

Graphic courtesy of Webweavers

The multi-holiday season is upon us; weather is occasionally fluctuating towards the cold, and people are counting the days, if they’re not there already, until they get a little time off from work or school. It’s time to fry those latkes and kindle the Chanukah lights! Local Jewish groups are rolling out the red carpet for this well-known Jewish holiday, which will take place this year from sundown Dec. 24 to sundown Jan. 1. Check these out! Feel free to add more in the comments, and chag sameach.

Hanukkah Happy Hour on the Hill
Annual young adult shindig sponsored by several Jewish organizations. Bring warm clothing for collection boxes headed to DC homeless community, sponsored by the EDCJCC.
Tuesday, Dec. 20, 6 pm, Capitol Lounge and Hawk N’ Dove

Chanukah at the Ellipse
American Friends of Lubavitch starts off the holiday season with this annual ceremony on the White House lawn.
Sunday, Dec. 25, 4 pm, the Ellipse

Community Chanukah Lighting
Family friendly inclusion & disabilities programming event, featuring lighting the menorah, eating Chanukah foods, spinning the dreidel, and more!
Wednesday, Dec. 28, 6:30 pm, EDCJCC

Hanukkah’s Extra Flame
Adas Israel, the EDJCC and other organizations team up with Sephardic Heritage in DC to provide a holiday concert, featuring internationally recognized Syrian opera singer, Lubana Al Quantar. The event will also center around relief efforts.
Wednesday, Dec. 28, 7 pm, Adas Israel

Adas Israel Hanukkah Events
Featuring info about observance, themed community events and more.

Check out more events for young professionals provided by Gather The Jews here!

New Time and Place for the Washington, DC Jewish Music Festival

Jewish-East Asian fusion band Sandaraa performs at the Washington, DC Jewish Community Center / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

Jewish-East Asian fusion band Sandaraa performs at the Washington, DC Jewish Community Center / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

Although we just did this song and dance in June, the re-tooling of the Edlavitch Washington, DC Jewish Community Center has shifted some things around. The 18th annual music festival started on October 26; they’re also moving the film festival to May instead of the winter.

Similar to the event that I attended at the last music festival, the one last Tuesday was a double feature of a documentary and a stage act. Paul Thomas Anderson, famously known for such films as There Will Be Blood and Steel Magnolias, directs his first documentary—an unassuming, 54-minute accounting of musicians practicing their craft in an ancient fort in Rajasthan, India.

The 2015 film, Junun, follows Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood to southeast Asia for this collaboration project with the Indian ensemble, the Rajasthan Express. Israeli composer Shye Ben Tzur rounded out the group and added some Hebrew influence to the music. I loved the notion that different people could share and transform their cultural expressions. It’s a hopeful message in and of itself about coming together in common purpose.

The documentary was recorded with occasional shaky cam and had little narrative structure; however it transcended any limitations by staying true to the emotionality of music. We laughed at the casual moments where the camera caught a musician picking his nose or making jokes about faulty electricity in India. But the real power came through juxtaposing images, like sweeping panoramas of the Indian environs or a pigeon roosting among the musical equipment, against the musical numbers. I heard people commenting on specific scenes after the film ended, to rancorous applause.

Following a brief intermission, we then listened to an hour and a half-long set, roughly, from the band Sandaraa. Like with the musicians in Junun, this band is a cultural collaboration, started by Pakistani vocalist, Zeb Bangash, and klezmer clarinetist, Michael Winograd. Most of their other band members hail from Brooklyn, many of whom have klezmer backgrounds. The music they played had a South Asian mentality, ranging from traditional folk songs to original compositions set to Urdu poetry, but some of the instrumentation hinted at Jewish influence.

The event went a little long—from 7:30 to 10 pm—and a sizeable portion of the audience left during the last half hour or so of Sandaraa’s performance. But the film and the music went so well together, thematically, that I understand why the festival paired them up. Perhaps it would have been better suited for a Sunday afternoon timeslot, though the house was packed at the EDCJCC either way.

The music festival ends on Nov 5 with another fusion project–Odessa/Havana. Check out my past coverage under the “annual events” tab.

A Belated Ringing In of 5777!

5777 break fast at Adas Israel / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

5777 break fast at Adas Israel / photo taken by Rachel Mauro

We may be most of the way through Sukkot now, but g’mar chatimah tova anyway. 😛 Hope you had a meaningful High Holiday season. Here are a couple of my highlights from Adas Israel:

  • I joined Adas Israel’s flash choir on Rosh Hashanah day 2 to sing a pretty, Hebrew, SATB-harmonized version of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” Hoping to do that again next year!
  • The “Return Again” Kol Nidre service was held in the parking lot rather than in front of the synagogue, to accommodate larger crowds. I found it a little more difficult to hear, but Rabbi Holtzblatt gave a good sermon about harnessing the evil inclination, yetzer hara and living with the good inclination, yetzer hatov.
  • Israeli settler Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger and and Palestinian Ali Abu Awwad returned to Adas for the Yom Kippur afternoon talk to plug the Roots Project, an inter-communal nonviolence initiative in the West Bank/Judea and Samaria. Here at home, this program heralded in the iEngage Series, a set of Sunday classes concerning narratives about Israel, which will be led by Rabbi Steinlauf. The first event is on Oct. 30.

The EDCJCC has shifted its schedule a bit, and the 18th Washington Jewish Music Festival starts on the 26th. I’m excited, but guys…you’ll be rescheduling the Literary Festival (traditionally held around now) sometime soon, right? *puppy dog eyes* Ah well. At least I can always hole up in my sukkah with a good book. 😛

Simchat Torah begins on Monday evening! Check out what local synagogues might be doing by clicking here.